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How to invest in gold

Investing in gold sounds simple, but there are several different options available. Their suitability will vary from person to person, depending on what they hope to get out of it and how much they are willing to invest.
Despite so many changes in the market over the last few years and all the emerging digital finance trends, gold remains a firm favorite with investors around the world. If you are wondering how to invest in gold, here are a few different ways you can get started.

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You can buy gold bullion

If you want to keep things simple, you can invest in the physical commodity of gold itself. Gold bullion is generally available in two forms: coins and or bars. You can buy these from a brokerage, a bank or from someone who deals in precious metals. One of the biggest advantages of buying physical gold bullion is that it offers security, but you will need to figure out how you are going to store it. If you want to invest in gold without the hassle of storage, you could invest in an unallocated gold account, which means that the bank would own the asset but would pay you its value when requested.

You can buy mutual funds or exchange-traded gold funds

When investing in gold, buying gold stocks could be a much better fit for you if you don’t want to deal with the ownership of the physical product. One of the most popular options is investing in exchange-traded funds (otherwise known as ETFs), which are much more diverse and offer greater liquidity than looking after a stock of bullion.
The ETFs include the likes of the renowned SPDR Gold Shares. Each stock that it offers is the equivalent of the price of a tenth of an ounce of gold. Other options allow you to buy stocks in funds tracking refining and mining companies. It goes without saying that you would be looking at more volatility in gold prices if you take this path, but the flexibility is so much greater.

You can buy gold futures options

Speaking of volatility, buying gold futures options is considerably riskier if you don’t have a lot of experience in investing. However, if you are confident and you know what you are doing, this could absolutely be the best choice for you.
When you set up a futures contract for gold, you are agreeing that you will buy or sell that asset by the agreed date or time. You are bound by this agreement, and it does not matter if the price is lower or higher than it was when you handed over your investment. Gold future options will need to be bought through an account at an online broker so you will need to set one up if you don’t have one already, or you could go through a traditional broker that deals in them. This is not an option that we would advise for a passive investor as you will need to keep an eagle eye on the market’s performance.

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Sharjah Museums Authority launches activities to mark International Museum Day

Sharjah Museums Authority (SMA) is marking the International Museum Day with a number of events held for three days between July 1 and July 3, 2022, at Al Zahia City Centre Mall.

During this year’s celebration under the theme ‘The Power of Museums,’ SMA’s lineup of activities will reflect the importance of museums as significant cultural and educational destinations.

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Members of the public will enjoy replicas of museum’s collections such as one-of-five astrolabes preserved by international museums, pearl sieves that were used to categorize pearl sizes, the ‘Burqa’ which is a traditional face wear that adorned Emirati women’s faces, and a statue of a camel that was uncovered in Muweilah area of Sharjah.

Activities between 10 am and 12 midnight at the mall’s main hall and theatre will also include guidd tours, live performances, and calligraphy workshops.

More events will focus on old Emirati professions and their tools with an aim to better connect community members with the rich history and heritage of the UAE.

“From promoting an understanding of differences, to addressing key social issues, museums are more important today than they have ever been,” said Manal Ataya, Director General of Sharjah Museums Authority.

Being educational centers and social spaces, Ataya said museums have the power to influence both change and development because they broaden knowledge, stimulate new ideas, encourage creative thinking, and help build social cohesion in their respective communities.

“Museums provide visitors with new perspectives and nurtures their curiosity to learn about other cultures, thereby building cultural bridges and supporting diversity in multicultural societies, in particular, as seen in the UAE,” she added.
The list of events also include a number of interactive programs and workshops about Islamic architecture, marine turtles, and pottery making that aim to engage children and adults alike.

Sixteen doors that represent SMA’s themed museums will introduce participants to the diverse offerings of the authority's distinguished cultural and educational centers.

International Museum Day is celebrated annually on May 18 to raise awareness about the importance of museums as means of cultural exchange and as centers of learning that educate people about the history of humankind.

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UAE Minister highlights nature-based solutions to mitigate climate change at UN meet

The UAE Minister of Climate Change and the Environment Mariam bint Mohammed Almheiri, participated in the UN Ocean Conference (UNOC), co-hosted by the governments of Portugal and Kenya in the Portuguese capital Lisbon, WAM (Emirates News Agency) reported.
Running from June 27 to July 1, UNOC seeks to drive the development of much-needed science-based innovative solutions aimed at starting a new chapter of global ocean action to support the implementation of UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14: Life Below Water. The conference is running under the theme ‘Scaling up ocean action based on science and innovation for the implementation of Goal 14: Stocktaking, partnerships and solutions.’
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Mariam Almheiri said, “It was a pleasure to attend UNOC that comes at a crucial time for ocean conservation. At the 28th UN Climate Change Conference (COP28) in the UAE next year, we aim to continue the dialogue on accelerating the deployment of ocean-based climate solutions. We are keen to exchange knowledge and experience with other countries, and explore opportunities for effective partnerships in this space. Because if we want to have a fighting chance of keeping global warming within 1.5˚C, we need to make the most of every solution available to us, and we need to do it together.”
During the interactive dialogue titled ‘Addressing Marine Pollution,’ the Minister explored ways to tackle marine pollution from land- and sea-based sources that has a serious negative impact on the world’s oceans.
Almheiri also attended the high-level meeting on ocean and climate that took place under the theme ‘From Lisbon to Sharm el-Sheikh: accelerating ocean-based climate solutions.’
The event’s outcomes will inform policy and investment decisions to be made in the run-up to COP27 and beyond.
In her opening remarks at the meeting, Minister Almheiri highlighted the importance of leveraging nature-based solutions, especially blue carbon ecosystems, to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change.
The UAE works to protect its marine and coastal environment and preserve its vital ecosystem services in line with its commitment to implementing SDG 14. These include expanding the network of marine protected areas, implementing fishing regulations, developing the aquaculture industry, combatting marine pollution, and rehabilitating degraded marine ecosystems.
The UAE has achieved the two targets of SDG 14 that had a deadline in 2020. Having designated 16 marine protected areas that account for 12.01 percent of its marine and coastal territory, the country reached Target 14.5 that entails conserving at least 10 percent of coastal and marine areas. In addition, the nation maintains global leadership in the Marine Protected Areas category of the Environmental Performance Index (EPI).
Through integrated management of its marine protected areas, whose effectiveness is being regularly evaluated, the UAE has also achieved Target 14.2 that requires countries to implement measures to sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems, and take action for their restoration.
The world’s oceans face a wide variety of threats – such as acidification, marine litter and pollution, illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing, and the loss of habitats and biodiversity – that require targeted efforts to address. UNOC’s sessions put each of these threats in the spotlight to spur a productive exchange of ideas aimed at preserving healthy oceans for future generations.

Read more: UAE explores sustainable city design at Green Building event ahead of COP28

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IVF children fare better at school than naturally conceived kids: Study

Children conceived through medically assisted reproduction treatments, such as IVF, artificial insemination, or ovulation induction, appear to perform better at school than those born through natural conception, according to a new study.

The research, conducted by University College London in partnership with Finland’s University of Helsinki, also found that while IVF children fared better at school, they were more prone to anxiety and depression in their teenage years.

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Published in the European Journal of Population, the research involved analyzing the records of over 280,000 children born over a five-year period and tracking them as they grew up. The scientists also studied the educational outcomes and mental health of those born through medically assisted reproduction (MAR).

The team also found that teenagers conceived by MAR were less likely to drop out of school and were at a lower risk of being unemployed or leaving home early compared to naturally conceived children.

“What we’re seeing here is mostly reassuring; children conceived through medically assisted reproduction do better overall and are in fact not more disadvantaged in terms of mental health outcomes,” study co-author Dr. Alice Goisis at UCL’s Centre for Longitudinal Studies said in a university release.

The observational study is thought to be the first to examine the correlations between conception methods, mental health, and wellbeing later in life.

“The fact that we observe an increased risk of mental health disorders once we account for family characteristics could be a cause for concern and merits further attention in future research,” she added.

The researchers said in a statement that the correlation for mental health was only observed when social demographics were taken into consideration, and that there was no evidence to suggest the MAR treatment itself was the source of association for mental health.

“We explicitly put a lot of focus on the social demographics of families who conceived through medically assisted reproduction – and our findings underscore the importance of integrating this perspective in studies of medically assisted reproduction and its consequences,” the statement said.

The research involved examining administrative records on over 280,000 Finnish children born between 1995 and 2000. They compared the educational and mental health outcomes among teenagers between the ages of 16 and 18 who were conceived naturally (266,925) and MAR (13,757).

The authors noted that MAR children are more likely to come from better off families who may provide children with resources (financial, time and emotional) that benefit their educational outcomes. However, they could also suggest that difficulties conceiving may expose parents to mental health issues, which could have impacted their children by putting them at greater risk of psychological distress.

“Whilst we don’t have the data to explain why those born by medically assisted reproduction are at slightly higher risk of mental health disorders, we believe that this may be due to different mechanisms,” lead author Dr. Hanna Remes from the University of Helsinki said.

“The fact that MAR-conceived children tend to be the first-born – around 60 per cent of the children in the study – explained some of the excess risks. It is also possible that because of the process they went through, parents of children conceived by IVF, for example, may have been exposed mental health problems, such as depression and anxiety, which may, in turn, have put the children themselves at higher risk of having mental health problems.”

Since the oldest child conceived by IVF treatment is now 43 years old, the researchers noted that this area of study is still relatively new.

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