Connect with us

World

Mayor says situation in Mariupol ‘beyond humanitarian disaster’

The situation in the besieged port of Mariupol in southeastern Ukraine has become “unlivable” since Russia launched its invasion in late February, the destroyed city’s mayor told AFP on Tuesday.
“We think that around 120,000 residents of the city have stayed behind. We have passed the point beyond a humanitarian disaster, because for the last 30 days, these people haven’t had heating, water – anything,” mayor Vadym Boichenko said.
Mariupol has been under siege from Russian forces for over a month, leaving the population to fend for themselves in conditions which have been denounced by the international community.
For the latest headlines, follow our Google News channel online or via the app.
Speaking with journalists in Zaporizhzhia, some 200 kilometers (124 miles) northwest of Mariupol, Boichenko said those who have remained behind despite persistent Russian shelling are experiencing dire conditions.
“It’s very important to evacuate them all. The situation for them is not dangerous, it is unlivable. We are trying to coordinate with different partners to get the entire population of Mariupol out,” he told AFP.
He said that since March 13 around 100,000 civilians have been removed from the city to safety.
The mayor said that Russian forces in the city were trying to convince residents they had been left to fend for themselves by Ukrainian officials.
“They are trying to make people believe that they have been abandoned and that the government is not doing anything to save them, send them help or try to evacuate them,” he told AFP.
Russian forces have “isolated and surrounded the town with their troops. Inhabitants are cut off from information from our government, they no longer have an internet connection,” he added.
The International Committee of the Red Cross has for days been trying to get a team to Mariupol to help provide safe passage for thousands of civilians seeking to leave.
Boichenko earlier this week told journalists that since Russian troops entered Ukraine, 90 percent of his city had been destroyed and 40 percent of Mariupol’s infrastructure could not be salvaged.
Read more:

France says to expel 35 Russian diplomats

Next phase of Russia’s war on Ukraine could last ‘months or longer’: White House

Zelenskyy on Bucha civilian killings: Russians treat Ukrainians ‘worse than animals’

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

World

Hundreds of stolen cars recovered in global Interpol operation funded by the UAE

A United Arab Emirates-funded global police operation targeting stolen vehicle trafficking has led to the recovery of hundreds of cars, trucks and motorbikes and almost half a million stolen cigarettes in just two weeks, Interpol announced on Wednesday.

Operation Carback saw frontline police at seaports and land border crossings in 77 countries use Interpol’s secure global police communications network – I-24/7 – to check vehicles and their owners against Interpol’s databases and instantaneously detect potential criminals or criminal activity.

For all the latest headlines follow our Google News channel online or via the app.

Interpol launched its ‘Reducing Vehicle Crime and Theft’ Program in 2016 with funding from the United Arab Emirates via Interpol’s ‘Foundation for a Safer World’, which financed Operation Carback 2022.

Since May 2016, the foundation has been supporting seven key Interpol initiatives by donating $52 million over a period of five years, as part of a contribution agreement between the Foundation and the UAE government.

In just over two weeks, Operation Carback led to the identification of 1,121 stolen cars and 64 motorcycles, the arrest or detention of 222 suspected stolen vehicle traffickers, the detention of eight suspected people smugglers, the detection of 26 fraudulent vehicle documents and the seizure of 480,000 stolen cigarettes.

Officers raided chop shops – places where stolen vehicles are dismantled into parts that are smuggled or sold online – with confiscations triggering further investigations into car crime gangs globally.

Interpol supported the operation by crosschecking information collected in the field against its international databases, with Frontex also supporting the European leg of frontline operations.

Experts from Interpol’s Stolen Motor Vehicles Unit were deployed to key locations to assist national law enforcement with database checks in the field as well as in exchanging, analyzing and acting on operational data.

With the Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN) typically removed from stolen cars, on-the-ground assistance from Interpol enabled national law enforcement to connect with car manufacturers to identify vehicle origin.

Because stolen vehicles are frequently trafficked to finance and carry out crime ranging from drug trafficking, arms dealing and people smuggling to corruption and international terrorism, the Interpol General Secretariat headquarters is analyzing intelligence gathered during Operation Carback to identify links with other crime areas.

“With vehicles usually smuggled beyond borders and ending up thousands of miles away from where they were stolen, an international operation like Carback is crucial to enabling police to tackle the networks behind global car trafficking,” said Ilana de Wild, Interpol’s director of organized and emerging Crime.

“The main key to the success of Operation Carback is the wealth of information contained in Interpol’s Stolen Motor Vehicle database, and the fact that throughout the operation police in the field were able to access this crucial data.”

Last year, Interpol identified some 248,000 stolen vehicles thanks to the SMV database. More than 130 countries shared their national data with Interpol, and carried out more than 280 million searches.

The UAE has close links with Interpol and in November it was announced that the country’s Major General Ahmed Nasser al-Raisi, of the UAE’s interior ministry, had been elected as the new President of Interpol.

The senior police official will serve the four-year term in Lyon, France.

The new appointment makes him the first candidate from the Middle Eastern region to be elected into the position since the global crime fighting agency was founded in the 1920s.

Read more:

UAE Major General Ahmed Nasser al-Raisi elected as new Interpol President

UAE joins Interpol operation to crack down on human trafficking gangs

Dubai Police arrest international drug lord known as ‘The Ghost’

Continue Reading

World

‘If Putin was a woman, there would be no Ukraine war’: UK’s Johnson

Russian President Vladimir Putin would not have started the war in Ukraine if he was a woman, according to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

“If Putin was a woman, which he obviously isn't, but if he were, I really don't think he would've embarked on a crazy, macho war of invasion and violence in the way that he has,” Johnson told German broadcaster ZDF on Tuesday evening.

For all the latest headlines follow our Google News channel online or via the app.

Putin's invasion of Ukraine is “a perfect example of toxic masculinity”, he said, calling for better education for girls around the world and for “more women in positions of power”.

The British Prime Minister acknowledged that “of course people want the war to end”, but for the moment “there's no deal available. Putin isn't making an offer of peace”.

Western allies must support Ukraine to enable it to be in the best possible strategic position in the event that peace negotiations with Moscow do become possible, he added.

Read more:

Russia poses a ‘direct threat’ to NATO security: Stoltenberg

Over 30 still missing after strike on Ukraine mall, Russia presses attacks on east

Russian missile strike in Ukraine's Mykolaiv blamed for three deaths

Continue Reading

World

Spain begins natural gas exports to Morocco following diplomatic row

Natural gas has started flowing from Spain toward Morocco through a pipeline that stopped flowing in November amid a diplomatic row between Morocco and Algeria, data from Spanish gas grid operator Enagas showed on Wednesday.
Algeria decided last year not to extend a deal to export gas through a pipeline running through neighboring Morocco to Spain, halting nearly all of Morocco’s gas supply, as relations between Rabat and Algiers worsened.
In April, Algeria warned Madrid not to re-export Algerian gas supplies to its Southern neighbor after Energy Minister Teresa Ribera confirmed plans to reverse the flow of the Maghreb Europe pipeline and begin exportation of natural gas to Morocco.
For the latest headlines, follow our Google News channel online or via the app.
“A certification process guarantees that this gas is not of Algerian origin,” a spokesperson for Enagas said on Wednesday.
In March, Spain angered its main gas supplier Algeria by supporting a Moroccan plan to offer autonomy to Western Sahara, prompting Algiers to suspend its 20-year-old friendship treaty with Madrid and causing a diplomatic crisis.
The shift was well received in Rabat as Morocco decided to return its ambassador to Spain after almost a year of absence following a long diplomatic dispute.
Read more:

UN calls for independent investigation into Spain-Morocco deaths

Spain, Morocco to open land borders next week after two years

Libya suspends oil shipments from key port amid political crisis

Continue Reading

Trending