Connect with us

Entertainment

Scans reveal details of unwrapped ancient Egyptian mummy

Published

on

Researchers have used digital technology to take the first accurate look inside the mummy of King Amenhotep I, which has remained unwrapped in modern times, according to a study published on Tuesday.

The scans revealed details about the appearance and mummification the 18th Dynasty king, who ruled Egypt from about 1525-1504 BC and was the son of New Kingdom founder Ahmose I.

Amenhotep's mummy, adorned with decorations on its linen wrapping and its funerary mask, was found along with those of other kings and queens in a cache in Luxor in 1881 and transferred to Cairo.

For the latest headlines, follow our Google News channel online or via the app.

Because of efforts to preserve the decoration, it was one of few royal mummies not to be physically unwrapped and examined in the modern era, according to the study in Frontiers in Medicine, a peer-reviewed medical journal.

In 2019, Egyptologist Zahi Hawass and Cairo University professor Sahar Saleem used a computed tomography (CT) machine to “digitally unwrap” the mummy before it was moved to a new collection at Cairo's National Museum of Egyptian Civilization.

The results of their study, published on Tuesday, showed that Amenhotep's face resembled that of his father, and estimated his age at death to be 35 years, though no cause of death was clear, according to a statement from Egypt's antiquities ministry. It appeared to show that he was the first king to be embalmed with his forearms crossed on his body, and proved that his brain was not removed, unlike those of most New Kingdom kings.

The scans also revealed 30 amulets or pieces of jewelry buried with the mummy, including a belt of 34 gold beads, showing that 21st Dynasty priests who rewrapped the mummy took care to preserve its ornaments, the ministry statement said.

During the reburial, the Theban priests re-attached Amenhotep's head and repaired other postmortem injuries likely inflicted by tomb robbers, according to the study.

Read more:

Scientists reconstruct 3D faces of Egyptian mummies from over 2,000 years ago

Expo 2020: Egypt unveils plans for world’s largest museum of Egyptian civilization

Egypt transports Pharaoh Khufu’s boat to new grand museum

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Entertainment

Musician Naseer Shamma seeks to rebuild Iraq through music, culture

Published

on

War kept him away from his beloved homeland for decades. Now, virtuoso oud player Naseer Shamma hopes to help rebuild conflict-scarred Iraq through a series of concerts and other projects to support culture and education.

The audience at the Iraqi National Theater were on their feet, overcome with emotion as Shamma played a night of classics from the Iraqi songbook and modern compositions.

“We will work on lighting the stage, to get out of the darkness into the light,” he told the crowd, before kicking off the evening with, “Sabah El Kheir Ya Baghdad,” or, “Good Morning Baghdad.” Behind him, an orchestra, including young women musicians, played traditional instruments.

For the latest headlines, follow our Google News channel online or via the app.

The 59-year-old Shamma is considered a modern-day master of the oud, a pear-shaped stringed instrument similar to a lute whose deep tones and swift-changing chords are central to Arabic music.

Born in the southern city of Kut and raised in a conservative family, he received his first oud lesson at the age of 11 and later graduated from the Baghdad Academy of Music in 1987.

He fled Iraq in 1993 during Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship and gained international fame, performing around the world and receiving dozens of awards. In Cairo, he founded the House of the Oud, a school dedicated to teaching the instrument to new generations.

Shamma, who currently lives in Berlin, returned to Iraq for the first time in 2012 to perform in a concert hosted by the Arab League. He said he was shocked and overwhelmed with sadness to see what had become of his country, which had fallen into non-ending cycles of war and sectarian blood-letting after the US-led invasion that toppled Saddam.

“I found concrete T-walls surrounding Baghdad, I felt like I was walking inside a can, not a city,” Shamma told The Associated Press in an interview, referring to the blast walls that line many streets in Baghdad.

He returned several times since, most recently in 2017, when Iraq was torn apart in its battle with ISIS who had captured much of the north.

This was Shamma’s first time back to an Iraq relatively at peace, though wracked by economic crisis. The mood, he noted, had changed, the city is more relaxed and the audience more responsive.

“The audience’s artistic taste had changed as a result of wars, but last night it was similar to the audiences of the ‘80s. I felt as if it was in an international concert like one in Berlin,” Shamma said Friday after the first of four concerts he is holding in Baghdad this month.

The concert series, held under the slogan “Education First,” aims to highlight Iraq’s decaying education system, which has suffered under years of conflict, government negligence and corruption.

According to the World Bank, education levels in Iraq, once among the highest in the region, are now among the lowest in the Middle East and North Africa. Ticket sales will go toward renovating the Music and Ballet School in Baghdad.

“In Iraq there are still schools made of mud, and students don’t have desks, they sit on the floor,” Shamma said. “Education is the solution and answer for the future of Iraq.”

Shamma is known for using his fame to support humanitarian causes, Iraqi children and art. A few years ago, he led an initiative that rebuilt the destroyed infrastructure of 21 main squares in Baghdad. He is also a UNESCO peace ambassador.

Shamma said he hopes he can return to Iraq for good in the near future and fired off a list of projects he has in mind to support reconstruction.

He expressed his opposition to religious parties who try to silence art and political opponents and praised Iraqi youth who paid a high price for revolting against their corruption.

“The Iraqi people and Iraqi youth will not accept the hegemony of so-called religious parties. This is an open country where culture plays a very big role,” he said, advocating for separation of politics from religion.

Fatima Mohammed, a 55-year-old Iraqi woman, shivering from the cold as she emerged from the concert on an uncharacteristically icy January evening, said the event was a message to everyone that Baghdad will never die.

“I felt as I witnessed the women playing that Baghdad is fine and will return despite all the pain that we carry with us,” she said.

“I will come tomorrow also to listen to music, it gives me hope in life.”

Read more:

ISIS rebirth

Iraq schedules crude shipments for March loading amid strong demand: Official

Yemen: Taking stock of Arab-American relations

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Saudi Arabia, Cirque du Soleil to debut shows, establish regional office

Published

on

Saudi Arabia has inked a new agreement with the Canadian entertainment group, Cirque du Soleil, which will bring its signature shows to the Kingdom, the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported on Tuesday.

The agreement was signed by Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan al-Saud, Minister of Culture and Chairman of the Theater and Performing Arts Commission, and Gabriel de Alba, Co-Chairman of Cirque du Soleil Entertainment Group Board of Directors, during a meeting in New York.

For the latest headlines, follow our Google News channel online or via the app.

Under the agreement, several shows will debut in the Kingdom, including The Illusionist, Now You See Me, Paw Patrol Live – Race to Rescue, Trolls Live, and Blue Man Group World Tour, SPA revealed.

Additionally, Saudi Arabia may also play host to a new Cirque du Soleil resident show unique to the country. So far, Cirque du Soleil has performed six shows in the Kingdom since 2018.

The latest was a performance honoring the renowned Argentinian football player Lionel Messi that was held in November during Riyadh Season 2021.

Owing to a successful run and the Kingdom’s attractive culture-oriented growth, the two parties plan to establish a regional Cirque du Soleil training academy and office, SPA added.

This will entail an educational curriculum for youth across the country. International circus school exchanges and artist-in-residence programs are also being developed.

Performing arts in the Kingdom have expanded rapidly since the establishment of the Ministry of Culture in 2018. The Theater and Performing Arts Commission aims to have 4,500 graduate performers and more than 4,000 qualified trainees by 2030, all according to the SPA release.

Read more:

Saudi Arabia: ‘Boutique Group’ to develop historic palaces into boutique hotels

Adele postpones Las Vegas residency due to COVID-19 impact, delivery delays

Short film on ‘war-torn’ Levant selected for Big Sky Documentary film festival in US

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Lab monkeys escape after road crash in Pennsylvania

Published

on

The crash in Pennsylvania of a truck transporting 100 monkeys to a laboratory allowed four of them to escape, triggering a search by police who warned the public not to approach the animals.

The vehicle collided with a dump truck near Danville, Pennsylvania on Friday afternoon, en route to a laboratory in Florida.

For the latest headlines, follow our Google News channel online or via the app.

Police said on Twitter that four moneys had “fled the crash scene into the surrounding area.”

Three were later captured, but one was still on the loose on Saturday morning.

The local WNEP news site said a police helicopter with thermal cameras was used to track down the cynomolgus monkeys, while officers on the ground used powerful flashlights.

Pennsylvania State Police released an image of one primate perched in a tree off Route 54 during the freezing cold night.

A reporter said police surrounded the monkey before shots were fired from an unidentified weapon.

“Crash Update: There is still one monkey unaccounted for, but we are asking that no one attempt to look for or capture the animal,” police troopers said on Twitter on Saturday morning.

Cynomolgus monkeys – also known as long-tailed macaques – can cost up to $10,000 each and have been in demand for coronavirus vaccine research, according to the New York Times. They can live for 30 years in captivity.

Continue Reading

Trending